The Archive: A Neoliberal Project

Robert Gehl discusses the ways in which the online technologies with which we interface on a daily basis are in fact investing a great deal in insuring that our actions are being archived. The “new media compa­nies and entrepreneurs […] assume a curatorial role” (1229) and thus have the power to determine what types of…

Retained Knowledge

In Rober W. Gehl’s article “The archive and the processor: The internal logic of Web 2.0” he talks about serves and memory storage in the Web 2.0 era. Moe specifically how this relates back to social media and the instantaneous interactions between users. This does begin to create some interesting points. With how social media…

Smart Fridges and the March of Progress

A recent class discussion over what exactly constitutes “too much” digitization and connectivity, sparked by smart fridges,piqued my curiosity about the conveniences I already enjoy that might be viewed as excessive or unnecessary by previous generations. The smart fridge proposes to ease the burden on fridge-owners by transferring the responsibility for monitoring food levels and…

Battle.net Forums and the “Real ID”

Russett’s article “A Contemporary Portrait of Information Privacy: Collective Communicative Consequences of Being Digital” explores the death of privacy online, examining both the death of privacy and the processes behind it. While reading the article, I was reminded of an incident which may serve as an instructive real-life example on Russett’s discussion, namely Blizzard Entertainment’s…

The New Privacy Policy: Desensitization

In Preston Russett’s Contemporary Portrait of Information Privacy the concept of online desensitization is discussed. Personal information is out there to be viewed on the web. However as users we have become used to seeing it all the time. Think about Facebook, everyone sees everything. All of your information like what you like, who you’re…

Privacy: Not a Priority

In Contemporary Portrait of Information Privacy: Collective Communicative Consequences of Being Digital Preston C. Russett discusses internet users and how today privacy on the web is no longer really an option. Privacy on the web is also no longer a priority to users. Russett explores the concept that the web has made it possible that…